Alaska Sea Grant reviews its performance in new annual report

November 15, 2017

cover of Alaska Sea Grant annual report 2016–2017 with three researchers study

As the year draws to a close, it’s time to reflect on our efforts over the past 12 months. Alaska Sea Grant (ASG) has worked in Alaska for nearly 50 years to sustain and grow our coastal economies and communities through marine research, education, and training. We’ve accomplished a lot over the past year while also facing some very tough budget challenges from Washington, D.C.

Our new 2016–2017 annual report captures many of the highlights. We invite you to take a few moments to check it out on our website. If you want a print copy, drop by our Anchorage or Fairbanks office and pick one up. Or write to us and we’ll mail you one.

image of online report

We had a busy year in research and workforce development. One of our projects on humpback whales and juvenile hatchery salmon in Southeast Alaska drew international media attention. Other projects that captured the public’s attention included our research on how to make seaweed farming a viable industry in Alaska, and monitoring tools developed by ASG-funded scientists to document coastal erosion in western Alaska.

image of online report

We’re continuing to shape future leaders in science and marine policy through our fellowships. One of our fellows is currently with the Lt. Governor’s team to craft Alaska’s new climate change policy. Another is working with Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s staff on marine policy matters.

We have lots more going on and we hope you will read about it in the annual report. Finally, we thank each and every one of you who stood strong with us in the face of the White House’s proposed elimination of the National Sea Grant College Program. While we are not out of the woods by any means, both houses of Congress have passed 2018 budgets that maintain Sea Grant funding for another year. Thank you for your continued support.

image of printed report

— By Paula Dobbyn

Alaska Sea Grant is a statewide marine research, education, and outreach program, and is a partnership between the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Alaska Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program agents provide assistance that helps Alaskans wisely use, conserve, and enjoy marine and coastal resources.