Estimating Economic Effects of Fishery Management Measures Using Geospatial Methods

Estimating Economic Effects of Fishery Management Measures Using Geospatial Methods

Astrid J. Scholz, Mike Mertens, Debra Sohm, Charles Steinback, and Marlene Bellman

Estimating Economic Effects of Fishery Management Measures Using Geospatial MethodsThis is part of Fisheries Assessment and Management in Data-Limited Situations
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Description

One of the main limitations of fishery management is that many routine data collection efforts are outpaced by evolving analytical needs. Examples include area-based management measures such as fishing closures and marine protected areas that are emerging in the context of ecosystem-based management. Typically, data collection efforts were not designed to address spatial issues. In the absence of comprehensive observer coverage or vessel monitoring systems, this creates a motivation for reinterpreting old data in new, spatially explicit ways. In this paper, we present a pilot geospatial relational framework for mining and integrating existing data developed for the West Coast of the United States (Washington, Oregon, and California), and discuss its applications to fishery management in the context of area-based management alternatives such as the groundfish closures instituted in 2002. Mining a variety of ecological, fishery dependent, and fishery independent databases, we built an extensive relational databas —the Ocean Communities "3 E" ANalysis (OCEAN) framework which allows the user to jointly consider ecological, economic, and equity (hence "3 E") implications of marine management measures. We standardized the data, and conducted a metaanalysis on them, mapping trends over time and space in a geographic information system (GIS) that covers the length of the West Coast from Washington to California and covers the entire exclusive economic zone (EEZ). Using this framework, we analyzed various management scenarios in terms of their effects on habitat areas and types, economic activity on shore, and likely implications for the fishing industry.

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