Chemical and quality changes when seeking full utilization of seafood resources through pressure processing technologies

Chemical and quality changes when seeking full utilization of seafood resources through pressure processing technologies

R. Ramírez, and J.A. Torres

Chemical and quality changes when seeking full utilization of seafood resources through pressure processing technologiesThis is part of A Sustainable Future: Fish Processing Byproducts
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Description

Pressure processing technologies offer new possibilities for producing high-quality products from underutilized seafood resources. High pressure processing (HPP) increases shelf-life and microbial safety while often improving both product texture and color. However, since every fish species has different textural characteristics, fatty acid composition, and oxidative stability, it is necessary to optimize HPP treatment for each species to increase the extent of microbial inactivation and minimize any negative effects on quality. This task is challenging and greater effort needs to be focused on defining effective HPP treatments. The application of pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP) to seafood, in spite of already being approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for commercial sterilization of low-acid foods, remains only a potential alternative for producing high quality seafood products such as shelf-stable restructured meats or products enriched with recovered salmon oil. To date no studies have been reported on the effects of PATP treatments on nutrients in seafoods, including omega-3 fatty acids.

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