King Crab Photo Gallery, 2006–2007

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Also see 2008 king crab photo gallery

Kodiak red king crab photos

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Sara Persselin and Brad Stevens NOAA Fisheries research biologists Sara Persselin and Brad Stevens display one of 32 red king crab captured in waters around Kodiak for use in a multiagency project aimed at rebuilding Kodiak's red king crab stocks. Photo courtesy NOAA Fisheries. sara-brad.jpg
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red king crab Red king crab the size of dinner plates were captured in waters around Kodiak as part of a multiagency project aimed at rebuilding Kodiak's red king crab stocks. Photo courtesy NOAA Fisheries. red-crab.jpg
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egg-bearing female crab Red king crab, like this egg-bearing female, once thrived in the cold, clear waters around Kodiak Island. State, federal and university scientists hope to cultivate king crab in hatcheries in numbers large enough to rebuild wild populations. Photo courtesy Jason Wettstein, Alaska SeaLife Center. crab-in-pool.jpg
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Sara Persselin Sara Persselin, NOAA Fisheries research biologist, prepares red king crab for transport from Kodiak to Seward, where they will be part of an Alaska Sea Grant study aimed at rebuilding Alaska's red king crab stocks. Photo courtesy NOAA Fisheries. sara-cooler.jpg
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crabs in cooler Red king crab captured in waters around Kodiak Island are packed, upside down, into coolers for the trip to Seward, where they will be part of an Alaska Sea Grant study aimed at rebuilding Alaska's red king crab stocks. The crabs are upside down to prevent them from crawling around and possibly injuring themselves or others. Photo courtesy Jason Wettstein, Alaska SeaLife Center. crabs-in-cooler.jpg
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Celeste Leroux and Isaac Swiderski University of Alaska Fairbanks graduate student Celeste Leroux and Isaac Swiderski introduce red king crab from Kodiak to their new home in Seward. The crab are part of a multiagency project aimed at rebuilding Kodiak's red king crab stocks. Photo courtesy Jason Wettstein, Alaska SeaLife Center. celeste-isaac.jpg (2.9 MB)

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Celeste Leroux Celeste Leroux, a graduate student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, handles one of 32 red king crab caught in waters off Kodiak for use in a multiagency project aimed at rebuilding Kodiak's red king crab stocks. Photo courtesy Jason Wettstein, Alaska SeaLife Center. celeste-crab.jpg
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Pribilof blue king crab photos

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St. Paul blue crabs

Blue king crab caught by fishermen in November 2006 as part of the Alaska King Crab Research and Rehabilitation Program, an effort aimed at understanding the large-scale culturing needs of crab with the goal of one day restoring depleted wild king crab stocks around Alaska's Kodiak Island and Pribilof Islands. Photo credit: Celeste Leroux, Alaska Sea Grant.

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Blue crab up close Blue king crab caught by fishermen in November 2006 as part of the Alaska King Crab Research and Rehabilitation Program, an effort aimed at understanding the large-scale culturing needs of crab with the goal of one day restoring depleted wild king crab stocks around Alaska's Kodiak Island and Pribilof Islands. Photo credit: Celeste Leroux, Alaska Sea Grant. st-paul-blue-close.jpg
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Jeff Sleer, fisheries observer Jeff Sleer, federal fisheries observer, holds a Pribilof blue king crab caught by fishermen as part of the Alaska King Crab Research and Rehabilitation Program, an effort aimed at understanding the large-scale culturing needs of crab with the goal of one day restoring depleted wild king crab stocks around Alaska's Kodiak Island and Pribilof Islands. Photo credit: Celeste Leroux, Alaska Sea Grant. sleer.jpg
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Pair of blue crabs Blue king crab caught by fishermen in November 2006 as part of the Alaska King Crab Research and Rehabilitation Program, an effort aimed at understanding the large-scale culturing needs of crab with the goal of one day restoring depleted wild king crab stocks around Alaska's Kodiak Island and Pribilof Islands. Photo credit: Celeste Leroux, Alaska Sea Grant. st-paul-blue-pair.jpg
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Crab egg photos

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General caption: Viewed through a microscope, eggs of red and blue king crab from adult broodstock collected last summer from waters around Kodiak Island and the Pribilof Islands show distinct eyes of larvae inside. Hair-like strands extend from the eggs to help them attach to the underside of the adult female. Although initially difficult to recognize as crab, the tiny larvae will within about five months after hatching molt into the first juvenile crab stage with distinct legs and claws. (Photos courtesy Celeste Leroux, Alaska King Crab Research and Rehabilitation Program, Alaska Sea Grant.)

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Red king crab eggs Now only about the size of a pinhead, the red king crab larvae inside these eggs will take about eight years to become harvest-size crab, among the world's largest crustaceans. The hair-like strands that extend from the eggs help them remain attached to the underside of the adult female during their development. (Photo courtesy Celeste Leroux, Alaska King Crab Research and Rehabilitation Program, Alaska Sea Grant.) red-kingcrab-eggs.jpg
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Eggs of blue and red king crab Pribilof blue king crab and Kodiak red king crab eggs. (Photo courtesy Celeste Leroux, Alaska King Crab Research and Rehabilitation Program, Alaska Sea Grant.) blue-red-kingcrab-eggs.jpg
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king crab eggs on slide Pribilof blue king crab eggs in sampling dishes on the right and left, and Kodiak red king crab eggs in the middle. Each of the eggs is approximately the size of a pencil tip. (Photo courtesy Celeste Leroux, Alaska King Crab Research and Rehabilitation Program, Alaska Sea Grant.) kingcrab-eggs-slide.jpg
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Crab zoea photos

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Red king crab zoea Kodiak Island red king crab larvae in the zoea stage, shortly after emerging from eggs at the Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery in Seward as part of the Alaska King Crab Research and Rehabilitation Program. (Photo courtesy Celeste Leroux, Alaska Sea Grant.) crab-zoea.jpg
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Eggs of blue and red king crab Only about the size of a pencil tip, Kodiak Island red king crab larvae in the zoea stage, shortly after emerging from eggs at the Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery in Seward as part of the Alaska King Crab Research and Rehabilitation Program. (Photo courtesy Celeste Leroux, Alaska Sea Grant.) crab-zoea-in-dish.jpg
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Blue king crab hatch photos

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blue king crab larvae Newly hatched blue king crab larvae at the Alaska King Crab Research, Rehabilitation and Biology (AKCRRAB) Program. (Photo courtesy Celeste Leroux, Alaska Sea Grant.) bluecrablarvae.jpg
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