Alaska Sea Grant


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Sea Lions of the World: Conservation and Research in the 21st Century

22nd Lowell Wakefield Fisheries Symposium

Anchorage, Alaska, USA
September 30–October 3, 2004

Contact: Sherri Pristash, fyconf@uaf.edu


Program

Program booklet [PDF; 741 KB]

Thursday

Session I: Life History;   session I posters
Session II: Physiological Ecology;   session II posters

Friday

Session III: Foraging Ecology;   session III posters
Session IV: Population Ecology;   session IV posters

Saturday

Session V: Population Dynamics;   session V posters
Session VI: Conservation and Management;   session VI posters

Sunday

Roundtable Discussions

Monday

Optional Field Trip to Seward

* indicates presenter or contact person if not first author


Thursday, 30 September


Registration and Continental Breakfast

7:30 – 8:30 a.m.

Welcome and Introduction

8:45 a.m.
• Brian Allee, Director, Alaska Sea Grant Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Plenary Speaker

9:15 a.m.
Status of Steller Sea Lions in Alaska
• Tom Loughlin, NOAA Fisheries (retired)


Session I—Life History

9:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.


Chair: Andrew Trites, University of British Columbia


Attendance Patterns of Juvenile Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in the Gulf of Alaska and Aleutian Islands Derived from Satellite Dive Recorders (SDRs)
• Katherine A. Call1, Brian S. Fadely1, and Angie Greig2, 1NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA; 2NOAA Fisheries, Resource Ecology Fishery Management, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Migration and Movements of Adult Male California Sea Lions
• Patrick J. Gearin, Sharon R. Melin, Robert L. DeLong, and Merrill E. Gosho, NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA

The Effects of Prey Availability on Maternal Attendance and Pup Mortality of South American Sea Lions (Otaria flavescens) in Peru
• Karim H. Soto and Andrew W. Trites, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada


Break

10:30 – 11:00 a.m.


Plasticity in Gestation Length in Response to Environmental Conditions in Australian Sea Lions Neophoca cinerea: New Hypotheses to an Enigmatic Life History
• Simon D. Goldsworthy1, Peter Shaughnessy2, and Rebecca McIntosh3, 1La Trobe University, Zoology Department, Sea Mammal Ecology Group, Victoria, Australia; 2CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 3 South Australia Research and Development Institute (SARDI), Aquatic Sciences, Henley Beach, South Australia, Australia

How Long Do Steller Sea Lions Drink Milk?
• Evgeny G. Mamaev1 and Vladimir N. Burkanov2,3, 1Vyatka Agricultural Academy, Kirov, Russia; 2Natural Resources Consultants, Inc., Seattle, WA; 3Russian Academy of Sciences, Kamchatka Branch of the Pacific Institute of Geography, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, Russia

Australian Sea Lion Pup Production, Mortality and Survival Rates, and the Age Structure of Breeding Females at Seal Bay Conservation Park, Kangaroo Island, South Australia
• Rebecca MacIntosh1, Simon Goldsworthy1, and Peter Shaughnessy2, 1La Trobe University, Sea Mammal Ecology Group, Zoology Department, Victoria, Australia; 2CSIRO, Sustainable Ecosystems, Canberra, ACT, Australia

Objective Classification of Trips-to-Sea Made by Juvenile Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in Alaska
• Michael J. Rehberg1,2 and Jennifer M. Burns1, 1University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Biological Sciences, Anchorage, AK; 2Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Anchorage, AK

Session I Discussion


Lunch

12:15 – 1:30 p.m.


Session II—Physiological Ecology

1:30 – 4:30 p.m.


Chair: Michael Castellini, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Institute of Marine Science


An Investigation of the Role of Hookworm Enteritis in New Zealand Sea Lion Pup Mortality
• Aurelie Castinel1, Padraig Duignan1,2, N. Gibbs1, and B.L. Chilvers3, 1Massey University, IVABS, New Zealand Wildlife Health Centre, Palmerstown North, New Zealand; 2Department of Conservation, Wellington, New Zealand; 3Canterbury University, School of Biological Sciences, Canterbury, New Zealand

Hookworms Arrest California Sea Lion Population Growth
• Robert L. DeLong1, Terry R. Spraker2, Eugene T. Lyons3, Sharon R. Melin4, and Jeffrey L. Laake4, 1NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA; 2Colorado State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Pathology, Fort Collins, CO; 3University of Kentucky, Department of Veterinary Science, Gluck Equine Research Center, Lexington, KY; 4NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA

Foraging in a Nutrient-Limited Environment: Development of Diving in the Threatened Australian Sea Lion
• Shannon L. Fowler and Daniel P. Costa, University of California Santa Cruz, Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Laboratory, Santa Cruz, CA

Organochlorine Contaminants in Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus) of the Northwestern Pacific
• Hiroshi Hoshino1, Shouichi Fujita2, Yoko Goto3, Takeomi Isono4, Tsuyoshi Ishinazaka5, Vladimir N. Burkanov6,7, and Yasunori Sakurai1, 1Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Division of Marine Environment and Resources, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan; 2Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Laboratory of Toxicology, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan; 3Hokkaido Kushiro Fisheries Experimental Station, Kushiro, Hokkaido, Japan; 4Econixe Co., Ltd., Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan; 5Nihon University, College of Bioresource Sciences, Laboratory of Theriogenology, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan; 6NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA; 7Natural Resources Consultants, Inc., Seattle, WA

Regional Variation of Juvenile Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) Growth Rates in Alaska
• B.S. Fadely1, T.S. Gelatt2, L.D. Rea2, J.C. King2, and T.R. Loughlin1, 1NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA; 2Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Anchorage, AK

Bioenergetic Demands of Sea Lions: Do Otariids Differ from Other Marine Mammals?
• Terrie M. Williams1, M. Rutishauser1, B. Long1, G. Gafney1, T. Fink1, H. Mostman1, and Dennis Christen2, 1University of California Santa Cruz, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Long Marine Laboratory, Center for Ocean Health, Santa Cruz, CA ; 2Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK


Break

3:00 – 3:30 p.m.


Hookworms in Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in Alaska
• Kathy A. Burek1, Kimberlee B. Beckmen2, Tom Gelatt3, Frank Morado4, and Steve Nadler5, 1Alaska Veterinary Pathology Services, Eagle River, AK; 2Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Fairbanks, AK; 3Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Marine Mammals Section, Anchorage, AK ; 4NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Resource Assessment & Conservation Engineering Division, Fisheries Resources Pathobiology, Seattle, WA ; 5University of California Davis, Department of Nematology, Davis, CA

A Decade of Adult Steller Physiology in the Field: Where Are We Now?
• Michael Castellini, University of Alaska Fairbanks, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Institute of Marine Science, Fairbanks, AK

Indices of Reproductive Effort and Nutritional Health in Lactating Steller Sea Lions and Pups in Areas of Declining and Stable Population
• R.W. Davis1, A.A. Brandon2, D. Calkins3, and T.R Loughlin4, 1Texas A&M University, Department of Marine Biology, Galveston, TX; 2Newtonville, MA; 3Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK; 4NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA

Session II Discussion


Break

4:30 – 5:00 p.m.


Poster Session and Reception

5:00 p.m.

Hors d'oeuvres and no-host bar


Session I Posters (Life History)

Bull Territoriality in Steller Sea Lions
• E.G. Mamaev, Vyatka State Agricultural Academy, Kirov, Russia

Male Harassment of Breeding Female New Zealand Sea Lions (Phocarctos hookeri): A Significant Source of Adult Mortality
• B.L. Chilvers1, B.C. Roberston1, I.S. Wilkinson2, P.J. Duignan3, and N.J. Gemmell1, 1Canterbury University, School of Biological Science, Christchurch, New Zealand; 2Department of Conservation, Science and Research, Wellington, New Zealand; 3Massey University, IVAB, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Unusual Mortality of Female Steller Sea Lions
• Vladimir N. Burkanov1, Thomas R. Loughlin2, and Donald G. Calkins3, 1Natural Resources Consultants, Inc., Seattle, WA; 2NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA; 3Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK

Steller Sea Lion Movements Based on Brand-Resighting Observations in Southeast Alaska: An Alternative to Satellite Telemetry
• Lauri A. Jemison, Thomas S. Gelatt, Ken W. Pitcher, and Kimberly L. Raum-Suryan, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Anchorage, AK

Differences in Breeding between Traditional and New Occupied Areas in South American Sea Lions (Otaria flavescens) at Punta León, Northern Patagonia
• Guillermo Svendsen, Enrique Crespo, and Silvana Dans, Centro Nacional Patagónico CONICET, and Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco, Puerto Madryn, Chubut, Argentina

A Field-Based Method for Estimating Age in Free-Ranging Juvenile Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus)
• James C. King, Thomas S. Gelatt, and Kenneth W. Pitcher, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Anchorage, AK


Session II Posters (Physiological Ecology)

Effects of Water Temperature on Swimming Metabolic Rates and Foraging Efficiency in Sea Lions
• David Thompson, Jason Matthiopoulos, and Ian L. Boyd, University of St Andrews, NERC Sea Mammal Research Unit, Fife, UK

Vitamin Supplementation Maintains Plasma 8-isoprostane Levels in Captive Steller Sea Lions
• Chun Hu1,2, Lisa Mazzaro3, David A. Rosen2, Andrew W. Trites2, and David D. Kitts1, 1University of British Columbia, Food, Nutrition and Health, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Mystic Aquarium, Mystic, CT

Potential Iron Deficiency Induced by Pollock Diet in Captive Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus)
• Saeko Kumagai, David A.S. Rosen, and Andrew Trites, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Plasma Lipid Composition in California Sea Lion (Zalophus c. californianus) Pups of the Gulf of California: Are There Differences?
• M.I. Castro-González1, D. Aurioles-Gamboa2, B.S. Montaño1, O.N. López1, and R.F. Pérez-Gil1, 1Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Dirección de Nutrición, D.F, Mexico; 2Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, La Paz, BCS, Mexico

Sleep in Young Steller Sea Lions and Northern Fur Seals: A Comparative Study
• O.I. Lyamin, University of California Los Angeles and VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Sepulveda Division, Department of Psychiatry, North Hills, CA

Use of Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Ratios in Vibrissae to Detect Weaning in Alaska Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus)
• Vicki K. Stegall1, Sean D. Farley1, Lorrie D. Rea1, Kenneth W. Pitcher1, Robert O. Rye2, Cynthia L. Kester2, and Carleton R. Bern2, 1Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Anchorage, AK; 2United States Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Stable Isotope Laboratory, Denver, CO

Medical Findings in a South American Sea Lion (Otaria flavescens) Newborn Pup
• Carlos F. Yaipen-Llanos, Gabriel A. Garaycochea, and Michelle Cáceres-Jerí, Organization for Research and Conservation of Animals: Marine Mammals (ORCCAMM), Lima, Peru

First Case of Neoplasm in South American Sea Lion (Otaria flavescens) from Peru: Lymphoma and Papilloma
• Carlos Yaipen-Llanos , Organization for Research and Conservation of Animals: Marine Mammals (ORCCAMM), Lima, Peru

Presence of the Hookworm (Uncinaria hamiltoni) in South American Sea Lions (Otaria flavescens) along the Coast of Patagonia: Preliminary Surveys
• Bárbara Berón Vera1, Enrique Alberto Crespo1, Guillermo Svendsen1, Nestor García11, Alejandro Buren1, and Juan Antonio Raga2, 1Centro Nacional Patagónico CONICET, and Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco, Puerto Madryn, Chubut, Argentina; 2Universitat de Valencia, Institut Cavanilles de Biodiversitat, Valencia, España

Resting Metabolic Rate in Free-Ranging Juvenile Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus): Life on the Edge
• Lisa A. Hoopes1, Lorrie D. Rea2, and Graham A.J. Worthy3, 1Texas A&M University, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, College Station, TX ; 2Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Marine Mammal Section, Anchorage, AK ; 3University of Central Florida, Department of Biology, Orlando, FL

Examination of Blood and Muscle Development in the Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus): Implications for Diving and Foraging Ability
• Julie P. Richmond1, Jennifer M. Burns1, and Lorrie D. Rea2, 1University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Biological Sciences, Anchorage, AK ; 2Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Anchorage, AK

Total Oxygen Stores in California Sea Lion Pups: Implications for the Development of Diving Behavior
• Carey E. Kuhn1, David Aurioles-Gamboa2, and Daniel P. Costa1, 1University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA; 2CICIMAR-IPN, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Sodium Chromate Toxicity and Uptake in Steller Sea Lion Cells
• Caroline E.C. Goertz1, Sandra S. Wise1, J. Lawrence Dunn3, Frances M.D. Gulland4, Andrew Morin1, Nishad Jayasundara1, Mary Bozza2, Shannon Atkinson2, and John Pierce Wise Sr.1, 1University of Southern Maine, Center for Integrated and Applied Environmental Toxicology, Portland, ME; 2Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK; 3Mystic Aquarium, Mystic, CT; 4The Marine Mammal Center, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, CA

Survey of Steller Sea Lion Corticosteroid Concentrations in Scat
• Kendall Mashburn and Shannon Atkinson, Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK

Distribution and Dynamics of Total Mercury, Cadmium, Zinc, and Copper in Southern Sea Lions (Otaria flavescens) from Argentina
• Marcela Gerpe1,2, Diego Rodríguez1,2, Jorge Moreno1, Ricardo Bastida1,2, and Julia Aizpún1, 1Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Chemical Contamination Levels in Steller Sea Lion Pups from Southwest Alaska and the Russian Far East
• Matt Myers1,2 and Shannon Atkinson1,2, 1Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK; 2University of Alaska Fairbanks, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Fairbanks, AK

Physiology of Homeostasis in Sea Lions: The Link between Hormones and Metabolism
• S. Atkinson1, T.M. Williams3, K. Mashburn1,2, D. Greig3, and D. Christen1, 1Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK; 2University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA; 3San Jose State University, San Jose, CA

Noninvasive Monitoring of Stress Hormone Levels of a Female Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) Pup Undergoing Rehabilitation
• Lisa Petrauskas1,2, Pamela Tuomi2, and Shannon Atkinson*1,2, 1University of Alaska Fairbanks, Institute of Marine Science, Fairbanks, AK; 2AlaskaSealife Center, Seward, AK

Juvenile Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) Dive Patterns during Long and Short Trips to Sea
• Jennifer M. Burns, Michael J. Rehberg, and Julie P. Richmond, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Biological Sciences, Anchorage, AK

Are All Sea Lions Created Equal? Comparison of Oxygen Storage Capacity of Adult Female California Sea Lions in California and Mexico
• Michael J. Weise and Daniel P. Costa, University of California Santa Cruz, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Center for Ocean Health, Santa Cruz, CA


Friday, 1 October


Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:00 – 8:30 a.m.

Plenary Speaker

8:30 a.m.
Comparison of Rising California Sea Lion Populations vs. Steller Sea Lion Declines
• Kathy Ono, University of New England, Biddeford, ME


Session III—Foraging Ecology

9:00 a.m. – 2:15 p.m.


Chair: Tom Gellatt, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center


Is Reproductive Success of New Zealand Sea Lions Limited by the Quality of their Milk?
• Frederico Riet Sapriza1, Padraig J. Duignan1, D.D. Mackenzie2, Alastair MacGibbon3, I.S. Wilkinson4, N. Lopez Villalobos1, and B. Louise Chilvers5, 1Massey University, IVABS, Palmerston North, Manawatu, New Zealand; 2Massey University, Department of Animal Science, Palmerston North, New Zealand; 3Fonterra Research Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand ; 4Department of Conservation, Science and Research Unit, Wellington,New Zealand ; 5University of Canterbury, School of Biological Sciences, Christchurch, New Zealand

Predictability of Prey Available to Free-Ranging Steller Sea Lions at Varying Spatial Scales
• Michael F. Sigler1, Scott M. Gende2, and David J. Csepp1, 1NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Juneau, AK; 2National Park Service, Glacier Bay Field Station, Juneau, AK

Feeding Behavior of Otaria flavescens in Response to the Operation of the Industrial Fishing Fleet of Trachurus symmetricus off Central Chile
• Luis A. Huckstadt1, M.C. Krautz2, C. Rojas3, and T. Antezana1, 1Universidad de Concepcion, Laboratorio de Ecologia Pelagica, Concepcion, Chile; 2Universidad de Concepcion, Laboratorio de Pesquera y Ecologia Larval, Concepcion, Chile; 3Concepcion, Chile

A Global Comparative Analysis of Sea Lion Diets
• Andrew W. Trites and Karim H. Soto, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada


Break

10:00 – 10:30 a.m.


Foraging Energetics of Lactating Sea lions: Response to Environmental Fluctuation
• Daniel P. Costa, University of California, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Santa Cruz, CA

Foraging Ranges of Female New Zealand Sea Lions (Phocarctos hookeri): Fisheries Interactions and Management Considerations
• B.L. Chilvers1, I.S. Wilkinson2, and P.J. Duignan3, 1Canterbury University, School of Biological Science, Christchurch, New Zealand; 2Department of Conservation, Science and Research, Wellington, New Zealand.; 3Massey University, IVAB, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Potential Effects of Short-Term Prey Changes on Sea Lion Physiology
• David A.S. Rosen, Dominic J. Tollit, Arliss J. Winship, and Andrew W. Trites, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Isotopic Differences between Zalophus in the Gulf of California and Galapagos Islands: Track Diet and Location
• David Aurioles-Gamboa1, Paul C. Koch2, Burney J. Le Boeuf3, Heidi Porras-Peters1, Sergio Aguiñiga-Garcia4, and Sandie Salazar-Pico4, 1Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas IPN, La Paz, BCS, Mexico, UC-Mexus Program, University of California—CONACyT; 2University of California Santa Cruz, Department of Earth and Marine Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA; 3University of California Santa Cruz, Department of Biology and Institute for Marine Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA; 4Fundación Charles Darwin, Galápagos, Ecuador

Sea Lions in Drag, Fur Seals Incognito: What Can We Learn from the Otariid Deviants?
• J.P.Y. Arnould1, D.P. Costa2, C. Kuhn2, and J. Gibbens3, 1Deakin University, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Burwood, Australia; 2University of California, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Santa Cruz, CA; 3University of Melbourne, Department of Zoology, Victoria, Australia

Prey Contributions to Energetic Content of Steller Sea Lion Diets
• J.J. Vollenweider, Jamie N. Womble, Ron Heintz, and Mike Sigler, NOAA Fisheries, Auke Bay Laboratory, Juneau, AK


Lunch

12:00 – 1:15 p.m.


Movement and Dive Behavior of Foraging Juvenile Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus) Associated with Pelagic Eddies
• J.T. Sterling, B.S. Fadely, and T.R. Loughlin, NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA

Bridging the Gap—Linking Real-Time Foraging Movements of Sea Lions to Prey Availability
• Mary-Anne Lea1, Ben Wilson1, Andrew Trites1, Michael Sigler2, and David Csepp2, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Behaviour@Sea Project, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2NOAA Fisheries, Auke Bay Laboratory, Auke Bay, AK

Food Consumption of Sea Lions: Data Gaps and Direction for Future Research
• Arliss J. Winship, Andrea M.J. Hunter, David A.S. Rosen, and Andrew W. Trites, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Session III Discussion


Session IV—Population Ecology

2:15 – 4:45 p.m.


Chair: Kate Wynne, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Marine Advisory Program


The Method of Multiple (Spatial) Hypotheses and the Decline of Steller Sea Lions in Western Alaska
• Nicholas Wolf1,2, Jason Melbourne2, and Marc Mangel2, 1Marine Resources Assessment Group Americas, Inc., Tampa, FL; 2University of California, Santa Cruz, CA

An Evaluation of Hot-Iron Branding as a Permanent Marking Method in the New Zealand Sea Lion, Phocarctos hookeri
• I.S. Wilkinson1, P.J. Duignan*2, C.J.A. Bradshaw3, S.J. Childerhouse1, and B.L. Chilvers4, 1Department of Conservation, Science and Research Unit, Wellington, New Zealand; 2New Zealand Wildlife Health Centre, IVABS, Palmerston North, New Zealand; 3University of Tasmania, School of Zoology, Antarctic Wildlife Research Unit, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; 4University of Canterbury, School of Biological Sciences, Christchurch, New Zealand


Break

2:45 – 3:15 p.m.


Using Leptospira interrogans Sensu Lato in Pups of the Sea Lion (Zalophus c. californianus) as a Tool to Determine Interactions among Populations
• Cecilia Pedernera1, David Aurioles Gamboa2, Jorge Torres Barranca3, Owaldo Martínez4, Dulce M. Brousset1, and Alberto Parás4, 1UNAM, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegación Coyoacán, Mexico; 2Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, I.P.N., La Paz, Mexico; 3UAM-Xochimilco Laboratorio de Leptospira, México D.F., Mexico; 4Africam Safari, Valsequillo, Puebla, Mexico

Are California Sea Lions in the Gulf of California, Mexico, Increasing in Abundance?
• Diana Szteren1, David Aurioles-Gamboa1, and Leah R. Gerber2, 1CICIMAR-IPN, La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico; 2Arizona State University, Department of Biology, Tempe, AZ

Population Biology and Status of Steller and California Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus and Zalophus californianus) in Canadian Waters
• Peter F. Olesiuk, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, BC, Canada

Population Ecology of Resident South American Sea Lions (Otaria flavescens) along the Central Peruvian Coast
• Carlos Yaipen-Llanos, Organization for Research and Conservation of Animals: Marine Mammals (ORCCAMM), Lima, Peru

Klebsiella pneumoniae Epidemics in New Zealand Sea Lions: A Natural Phenomenon or an Adverse Human Impact?
• P.J. Duignan1, A. Castinel1, A. Grinberg1, and I.S. Wilkinson2, 1Massey University, IVABS, New Zealand Wildlife Health Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand; 2Department of Conservation, Science and Research, Wellington, New Zealand

Session IV Discussion


Break

4:45 – 5:15 p.m.


Poster Session and Social

5:15 p.m.


Session III Posters (Foraging Ecology)

Estimation of Otolith Recovery in Feces through Captive Feeding Trials in Southern Sea Lions (Otaria flavescens)
• Diego Rodríguez, Laura Rivero, and Ricardo Bastida, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, CONICET, and Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Mar del Plata, Argentina

Seasonal Foraging Behavior of Lactating California Sea Lions
• Sharon R. Melin and Robert L. DeLong, NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA

Diving Physiology of Steller Sea Lions: Insights from Trained Animals in the Open Ocean
• Gordon D. Hastie, David A.S. Rosen, Graham E. Wallace, and Andrew W. Trites, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Shouldn't We Ask Where? Stable Isotopic Evidence of Geographical Variations in Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) Diets
• Pieter A.P. deHart1 and Matthew J. Wooller1,2, 1University of Alaska Fairbanks, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Institute of Marine Science, Fairbanks, AK; 2University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Stable Isotope Facility, Water and Environmental Research Center, Fairbanks, AK

Diving Behavior of Male South American Sea Lions (Otaria flavescens)
• Gabriele Müller and Rory Wilson, Leibniz-Institut für Meereswissenschaften, Marine Zoologie, Kiel, Germany

Movements of a Juvenile Southern Sea Lion in La Plata River Estuary (Argentina-Uruguay)
• Diego Rodríguez1, Ricardo Bastida1, Donald G. Calkins2, and Randall W. Davis3, 1Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, CONICET, and Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Mar del Plata, Argentina; 2Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK; 3Texas A&M University, Department of Marine Biology, Galveston, Texas

Importance of Seasonally Available Prey for Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus) at Benjamin Island, Southeastern Alaska
• Jamie N. Womble and Michael F. Sigler, NOAA Fisheries, Auke Bay Laboratory, Juneau, AK

Using Feeding Trials and Computer Simulations to Reconstruct Sea Lion Diet from Scat
• Ruth Joy1, Dominic J. Tollit1, Jeffrey L. Laake2, and Andrew W. Trites1, 1University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA

Assessing Overlap between Steller Sea Lion Diets and Fish Distributions in the North Pacific
• Emma L. Bredesen, Andrea P. Coombs*, and Andrew W. Trites, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Seasonal Availability of Nearshore Prey to Steller Sea Lions near Two Haul-outs in Southeastern Alaska
• John F. Thedinga, Scott W. Johnson, and David J. Csepp, NOAA Fisheries, Auke Bay Laboratory, Juneau, AK

Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) Feeding Habits in the Russian Far East
• Jason N. Waite1 and Vladimir N. Burkanov2, 1Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK; 2Natural Resources Consultants, Inc., Seattle, WA

Using Fatty Acids to Investigate Dietary Changes in Young Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in Alaska
• Carrie A. Beck1, Lorrie D. Rea2, Sara J. Iverson3, John Kennish1, Kenneth W. Pitcher2, and Dom J. Tollit4, 1University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK; 2Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Anchorage, AK; 3Dalhousie University, Biology Department, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 4University of British Columbia, Department of Zoology, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Following in the Wake of Sea Lions: Fine-Scale Boat-Based Tracking of Juvenile Steller Sea Lions Reveals Distinct Habitat Preferences for Shorelines
• Ben Wilson, Mary-Anne Lea*, and Andrew W. Trites, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Behaviour@Sea Project, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Comparisons of Blubber Fatty Acids between Sexes of Adult Steller Sea Lions
• Laura K. Hoberecht1, Glenn R. VanBlaricom1, and Bryan J. Prazen2, 1University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Seattle, WA ; 2University of Washington, Department of Chemistry, Center for Process Analytical Chemistry, Seattle, WA

Variation in the Quality of Steller Sea Lion Prey from the Aleutian Islands and Southeastern Alaska
• L. Schaufler1, E. Logerwell2, and J. Vollenweider1, 1NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Auke Bay Laboratory, Juneau, AK; 2NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Spatially Explicit Foraging Ecology of Juvenile Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus)
• M.E. Lander1, T.R. Loughlin2, G.R. VanBlaricom1, and M.L. Logsdon3, 1University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Seattle, WA; 2NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA; 3University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA

Ontogeny of Foraging Behaviors of the Immature California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)
• Anthony J. Orr1,2, Robert L. DeLong1, Glenn R. VanBlaricom2, and Miles L. Logsdon3, 1NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA; 2University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Seattle, WA; 3University of Washington, School of Oceanography, College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences, Seattle, WA

Techniques for Capture and Handling of Steller and California Sea Lions
• Steven Jeffries1, Peter Olesiuk2, Pat Gearin3, Dyanna Lambourn1, and Andrew Trites4, 1 Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Marine Mammal Investigations, Tacoma, WA; 2Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, BC, Canada; 3NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA; 4University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Are Steller Sea Lions Prey-Limited? Ask Their Neighbors!
• Kate M. Wynne1, Robert J. Foy2, Brian Knoth2, and C. Loren Buck2, 1University of Alaska Fairbanks, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Alaska Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program, Kodiak, AK; 2University of Alaska Fairbanks, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Fishery Industrial Technology Center, Kodiak, AK

Estimating Ecological Niche Overlap between Steller Sea Lions and Commercial Trawl Fisheries in Alaska
• Edward J. Gregr and Andrew W. Trites*, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Persistence of Prey "Hot Spots" for Steller Sea Lions in Southeast Alaska
• Scott Gende1 and Mike Sigler2, 1National Park Service, Glacier Bay Field Station, Juneau, AK; 2NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Juneau, AK

A Model of Diving Behavior Applied to Steller Sea Lion Foraging
• Carlos Alvarez-Flores1 and Sarah Hinckley2, 1Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and the Ocean, Seattle, WA; 2NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Estimating Diet Composition in Sea Lions: What Technique to Choose?
• Dom Tollit, Susan Heaslip, Ruth Joy, and Andrew W. Trites, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Individually Based Modeling of Steller Sea Lion Foraging Behavior
• Sarah Hinckley1, Carlos Alvarez-Flores2, John Horne3, Julian Burgos3, and Martin Dorn1, 1NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; 2University of Washington, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and the Ocean, Seattle, WA; 3University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Seattle, WA

Effects of Increased Swimming Costs on Foraging Efficiency of Captive Steller Sea Lions
• Leslie A. Cornick1, Markus Horning2, Susan Inglis3, and Kate Willis2, 1Alaska Pacific University, Anchorage, AK; 2Texas A&M University, Laboratory for Applied Biotelemetry and Biotechnology, Galveston, TX; 3University of Alaska Fairbanks, Institute of Marine Science, Fairbanks, AK


Session IV Posters (Population Ecology)

Implications of the Prince William Sound Herring Population Crash: Did It Impact Steller Sea Lions?
• Gary L. Thomas1 and Richard E. Thorne2, 1Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Miami, FL; 2Prince William Sound Science Center, Cordova, AK

Status of the Western Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) Population in 2004
• Lowell Fritz1, Charles Stinchcomb2, Thomas Loughlin1, and Wayne Perryman2, 1NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; 2NOAA Fisheries, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, La Jolla, CA

Diurnal and Seasonal Activity Patterns of Oregon's Steller Sea Lions
• Jennifer Katalinich, Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR

Trends in Pup Abundance of Australian Sea Lions Neophoca cinerea in South Australia
• Peter Shaughnessy1, Rebecca McIntosh*2, and Simon Goldsworthy2, 1CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 2La Trobe University, Zoology Department, Sea Mammal Ecology Group, Victoria, Australia

Human Interaction Impact on South American Sea Lions Recorded in Strandings along Central Peruvian Coast
• Michelle Cáceres-Jerí, Carlos F. Yaipén-Llanos*, and Gabriel A. Garaycochea, Organization for Research and Conservation of Animals: Marine Mammals (ORCCAMM), Lima, Peru

Changes in Abundance and Sightings of Marked Steller Sea Lion in Hokkaido
• Takeomi Isono1, Hiroshi Hoshino2, Takuma Takayama2, Tsuyoshi Ishinazaka3, Vladimir Burkanov4, and Yasunori Sakurai2, 1Econixe Co., Ltd., Hokkaido, Japan; 2Hokkaido University, Division of Marine Environment and Resources, Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan; 3Nihon University, College of Bioresource Sciences, Laboratory of Theriogenology, Kanagawa, Japan; 4Natural Resources Consultants, Inc., Seattle, WA

Wintering of Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) along the Northern Coast of the Sea of Japan
• Hiroshi Hoshino1, Takeomi Isono2, Takuma Takayama1, Tsuyoshi Ishinazaka3, Akihiko Wada4, and Yasunori Sakurai1, 1Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Division of Marine Environment and Resources, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan; 2Econixe Co., Ltd., Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan; 3Nihon University, College of Bioresource Sciences, Laboratory of Theriogenology, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan; 4Hokkaido Wakkanai Fisheries Experimental Station, Wakkanai, Hokkaido, Japan


Saturday, 2 October


Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:00 – 8:30 a.m.

Plenary Speaker

8:30 a.m.
Conservation Management Issues and Status of Australian and New Zealand Sea Lions
• Richard Campbell, Department of Fisheries, West Australian Marine Research Laboratories


Session V—Population Dynamics

9:00 – 11:15 a.m.


Chair: Lowell Fritz, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center


Estimation of Weaning Status of Juvenile Steller Sea Lions Using Mark-Resight Models
• Kenneth W. Pitcher1, Grey W. Pendleton2, and Thomas S. Gelatt1, 1Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Anchorage, AK; 2Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Douglas, AK

Age- and Sex-Specific Survivorship of California Sea Lions
• J. Laake, R. Delong, and S. Melin, NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA

Correlations between the Steller Sea Lion Decline and the Bering Sea/Gulf of Alaska Commercial Fishery
• Daniel R. Hennen, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT

Can Experimental Manipulation Be Used to Determine the Cause of the Decline of the Western Stock of Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus)?
• André E. Punt and Gavin Fay*, University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Seattle, WA


Break

10:00 – 10:30 a.m.


Historic Changes in Distribution and Abundance of Steller Sea Lions in the Western Pacific, 1700s–2002
• Vladimir Burkanov1,2 and Thomas R. Loughlin3, 1Natural Resources Consultants, Inc., Seattle, WA; 2Russian Academy of Sciences, Kamchatka Branch of the Pacific Institute of Geography, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, Russia; 3NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA

The Size and Status of the Population of Southern Sea Lions in the Falkland Islands
• David Thompson1, Callan D. Duck1, Ian Strange2, and Michael Riddy3, 1University of St Andrews, NERC Sea Mammal Research Unit, Fife, UK; 2New Island Conservation Trust, New Island, Falkland Islands; 3Dorset Wildlife Trust, Brooklands Farm, Dorchester, UK

Session V Discussion


Session VI—Conservation and Management

11:15 a.m. – 4:15 p.m.


Chair: Doug DeMaster, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center


A Synthesis of Australian Sea Lion Research and the Development of Effective Conservation: Where to from Here?
• Richard Campbell1 and Nicholas Gales2, 1Department of Fisheries, West Australian Marine Research Laboratories, North Beach, Australia; 2Australian Antarctic Division, Kingston, Tasmania, Australia

An Integrated Bayesian Model for Exploring the Interaction between Hooker's Sea Lions (Phocarctos hookeri) and the New Zealand Squid Fishery
• Paul A. Breen and Susan W. Kim, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Wellington, New Zealand

Are Trawl Exclusion Zones Effective at Mitigating Competition between Commercial Fisheries and Steller Sea Lions?
• Elizabeth A. Logerwell and Susanne F. McDermott, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA


Lunch

12:00 – 1:15 p.m.


A Critical Review of the Regime Shift–"Junk Food" Hypothesis for the Decline of the Western Stock of Steller Sea Lions
• Lowell Fritz and Sarah Hinckley, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

How Uncertainties about Competition between Steller Sea Lions and U.S. Groundfish Fisheries off Alaska Have Been Addressed in Fisheries Regulations
• Shane Capron1 and Lowell Fritz2, 1NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Region, Office of Protected Resources, Anchorage, AK; 2NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA

Conservation and Status of Sea Lions in Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands
• Juan Jose Alava, University of South Carolina, School of the Environment, Columbia, SC

A Health Assessment Approach to Steller Sea Lion Research in Alaska
• Kimberlee B. Beckmen1, Kathy A. Burek2, Lorrie D. Rea3, and Thomas S. Gelatt3, 1Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Fairbanks, AK; 2Alaska Veterinary Pathology Services, Eagle River, AK; 3Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Anchorage AK

Pinniped Policy: Dealing with Scientific Uncertainty
• Shilpa Rajkumar and Sali J. Bache, University of Wollongong, Centre for Maritime Policy, New South Wales, Australia

A Long-Term Program on South American Sea Lions of Argentina
• H.L. Cappozzo, Estación Hidrobiológica de Puerto Quequén, Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia" (MACN-CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; presented by Diego Rodríguez*, CONICET, Mar del Plata, Argentina


Break

2:45 – 3:15 p.m.


Is Human Disturbance Affecting Steller Sea Lions?
• Laura Kucey and Andrew W. Trites, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Uncertain Management or Management of Uncertainty: Steller Sea Lion—A Case Study
• Robert J. Small1 and Douglas P. DeMaster2, 1Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Juneau, AK; 2NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Integrating Behavior and Demography in Pinniped Conservation: California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) in the Gulf of California
• Leah R. Gerber1, Claudia Hernández Camacho1,2, Manuela Gonzalez Suarez1, Mariana Issa2, Lauren Horwitz1, and David Aurioles2, 1Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ; 2Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, Departamento de Pesquerías y Biología Marina, La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Session VI Discussion

Symposium Wrap-Up

4:15 – 4:45 p.m.


Break

4:45 – 5:15 p.m.


Poster Session and Social

5:15 p.m.


Session V Posters (Population Dynamics)

The Decline of Steller Sea Lions and the Ecosystem of the Gulf of Alaska
• Sylvie Guénette, Sheila J.J. Heymans, Villy Christensen, and Andrew W. Trites, University of British Columbia, Fisheries Centre, Marine Mammal Research Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada

A Bayesian Stochastic Metapopulation Model for Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus): Evaluating Changes in Model Fits with Different Assumptions about the Causes for Population Decline
• Gavin Fay and André E. Punt, University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Seattle, WA

Composition and Long-Term Numerical Fluctuations in a Southern Sea Lion Colony at Mar del Plata Harbor (Argentina)
• Diego Rodríguez1, Marcela Natal2, and Ricardo Bastida1, 1Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, CONICET, and Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Mar del Plata, Argentina; 2Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Matemática, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Mar del Plata, Argentina

Survival Rates of Steller Sea Lions in Southcentral and Southeastern Alaska
• Grey W. Pendleton1, Kenneth W. Pitcher2, Lowell W. Fritz3, and Thomas S. Gelatt2, 1Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Wildlife Conservation, Douglas, AK; 2Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Wildlife Conservation, Anchorage, AK; 3NOAA Fisheries, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, WA

Survival of Steller Sea Lion Pups from Branding to Three Months after Branding at Lowrie Island, Alaska
• Kelly Hastings and Tom Gelatt, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Anchorage, AK

Survival Estimates for California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) in the Gulf of California, Mexico
• Claudia J. Hernández Camacho1, David Aurioles Gamboa1, Jaume Forcada2, and Donald A. Croll3, 1Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas-IPN, Departamento de Pesquerías y Biología Marina, La Paz, Mexico; 2NERC, Biological Sciences Division, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK; 3University of California Santa Cruz, Center for Ocean Health, Santa Cruz, CA


Session VI Posters (Conservation and Management)

Steller Sea Lion Protection Measures in the Alaska Groundfish Fisheries: Spatial and Temporal Harvest Control
• Melanie N. Brown1, Brandee L. Gerke2, and William J. Wilson3, 1NOAA Fisheries, Sustainable Fisheries Division, Alaska Region, Juneau, AK; 2NOAA Fisheries, Protected Resources Division, Alaska Region, Juneau, AK; 3North Pacific Fishery Management Council, Anchorage, AK

Acoustic Characteristics and Morphological Observation of Roar Sound of Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) Migrating to the West Coast of Hokkaido, Northern Japan
• Kohji Iida, Tae-Geon Park, Tohru Mukai, and Shoji Kotani, Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan

Relationship between Roar Sound and Behavior of Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) Migrating to the West Coast of Hokkaido, Northern Japan
• Tae-Geon Park, Kohji Iida, Tohru Mukai, and Shoji Kotani, Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan

Fishery Effects: Testing the Local Depletion Hypothesis
• M. Elizabeth Conners, Elizabeth A. Logerwell*, and Peter Munro, NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA

Movements and Diving Behavior of Juvenile Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus) during the Winter and Spring in Southcentral Alaska
• H.B. Briggs1, D. Calkins2, and R.W. Davis1, 1Texas A&M University, Department of Marine Biology, Galveston, TX; 2Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK

Entanglements of North American Sea Lions in Marine Debris: Do We Know Enough?
• Kimberly L. Raum-Suryan1, Frances Gulland2, Thomas S. Gelatt1, and Lauri Jemison1, 1Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Anchorage, AK; 2The Marine Mammal Center, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, CA;

Effect of Marking Operations on Pup Survival at Medny Island (Russia), 1991–2001
• Vladimir N. Burkanov1,2 and Evgeny G. Mamaev3, 1Natural Resources Consultants, Inc., Seattle, WA; 2Russian Academy of Sciences, Kamchatka Branch of the Pacific Institute of Geography, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, Russia; 3Vyatka State Agricultural Academy, Kirov, Russia

Method for Field Identification of South American Sea Lions: Operational Tool for Research and Management
• Gabriel A. Garaycochea, Carlos F. Yaipén-Llanos*, and Michelle Cáceres-Jerí, Organization for Research and Conservation of Animals: Marine Mammals (ORCCAMM), Lima, Peru

Can a New Marine Mammal Law Be Developed in Peru? An Analysis of Environment Legal Order
• Mariana Alegre-Escorza and Carlos F. Yaipen-Llanos*, Organization for Research and Conservation of Animals: Marine Mammals (ORCCAMM), Lima, Peru

Effects of Tourism on Australian Sea Lions (Neophoca cinerea) at Seal Bay Conservation Park, South Australia
• Terijo Arianna1, David Croft1, Peter Banks1, and Graeme Moss2, 1University of New South Wales, School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, Sydney, Australia; 2National Parks and Wildlife South Australia, Kingscote, South Australia, Australia

The Impact of International Law on the Conservation and Management of Pinnipeds
• Shilpa Rajkumar and Sali J. Bache, University of Wollongong, Centre for Maritime Policy, New South Wales, Australia

TASSC: Sea Lion Comanagement in Alaska
• Lianna Jack1, Donna Willoya1, Dolly Garza2, and Margaret Roberts1, 1The Alaska Sea Otter and Steller Sea Lion Commission (TASSC), Anchorage, AK; 2Marine Advisory Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Ketchikan, AK

Future Directions: Seal Bay Conservation Park, Kangaroo Island, South Australia
• Jacqueline Wright, Department for Environment and Heritage, Seal Bay Conservation Park, Kingscote, South Australia, Australia

The Effects of Movement Rates on Viability Predictions: California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) as a Case Study
• Manuela Gonzalez-Suarez1, Kevin E. McCluney1, Jennifer C. Rupnow1, Leah R. Gerber1, and David Aurioles2, 1Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ ; 2Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, Departamento de Pesquerias y Biologia Marina, La Paz, Mexico

Organochlorine Levels in Steller Sea Lion Prey from the Aleutian Islands and Southeastern Alaska
• Ron Heintz1, Margaret M. Krahn2, G.M. Ylitalo2, and Frank Morado3, 1NOAA Fisheries, Auke Bay Laboratory, Juneau, AK; 2NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Montlake Laboratory, Seattle, WA; 3NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, RACE Division, Seattle, WA

Potential Interactions between State-Managed Fisheries and Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus)
• Nathan J. Soboleff and Gordon H. Kruse, University of Alaska Fairbanks, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Juneau Center, Juneau, AK

Southern Sea Lions and Artisanal Fisheries in Uruguay: Comparing the Conflicts through Three Years
• Diana Szteren1, 2, Cecilia Lezama11, 1Universidad de la República, Sección Zoología Vertebrados, Facultad de Ciencias, Montevideo, Uruguay; 2CICIMAR-IPN, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Avoidance Behavior of Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) to Artificial Sound Stimuli
• Kohji Iida, Tae-Geon Park, Tohru Mukai, and Shoji Kotani, Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan


Sunday, 3 October


Continental Breakfast

8:00 – 9:00 a.m.

Roundtable Discussions

Sign up at the registration desk by Saturday, 2 October, for the discussion groups you wish to attend.

Anchorage Room

Juneau Room

Haines Room

9:00 – 10:30 a.m.

Topic: Learning from Our Data Gaps: Population Research and Monitoring Priorities

Session leaders: Bob Small and Kate Wynne

Topic: Physiology and Metabolism

Session leader: Kendall Mashburn

Topic: Telemetry Techniques and Analysis in Sea Lion Research: What Is the State of the Art?

Session leaders: Mary-Anne Lea and Mike Rehberg

10:30 – 10:45 a.m. break

10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Topic: Quantifying Predation on Sea Lions: Identifying Key Parameters and Data Needs

Session leaders: Ben Wilson and Arliss Winship

Topic: Open session

Topic: Telemetry Attachment Techniques: What Works and What Doesn’t?

Session leaders: Mary-Anne Lea and Mike Rehberg

12:15 – 1:30 p.m. lunch

1:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Topic: Dietary Analysis of Sea Lions: How Should It Be Done?

Session leader: Andrew Trites

Topic: Foraging Studies

Session leader: TBA

Topic: Open session



Monday, 4 October

Optional field trip to Seward, Alaska

7:45 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.

On Monday, October 4, 2004, we will be traveling via motorcoach to Seward, Alaska. Included in the field trip will be a scenic ride along Turnagain Arm onto the Kenai Peninsula, a behind-the-scenes tour of the Alaska SeaLife Center, a catered lunch, free time to explore the coastal town, and a stop at Alyeska Ski Resort for dinner (dinner not included in field trip price) on our return trip to Anchorage. The cost of the field trip is $60. A few seats are still available. If you are interested in joining us, please see Sherri Pristash or Adie Callahan at the registration desk.

Alaska SeaLife Center

Schedule

7:45 a.m.

meet in hotel lobby

8:00 a.m.

depart from Marriott Downtown Hotel

11:00 a.m.

arrive in Seward

12:00 p.m.

lunch (provided) and tour of the Alaska SeaLife Center

4:00 p.m.

depart Seward

6:00 p.m.

arrive at Alyeska Ski Resort, dinner is on your own

8:00 p.m.

depart Alyeska Ski Resort

9:00 p.m.

drop off at Anchorage International Airport

9:45 p.m.

return to Marriott Downtown Hotel

Those of you already signed up, please pay your fees at the symposium registration desk by Saturday, October 2. Thank you!


Roundtable Discussion Descriptions

Telemetry Techniques and Analyses in Sea Lion Research: What Is the State of the Art?
Session leaders: Mary-Anne Lea & Mike Rehberg
Email: lea@zoology.ubc.ca and michael_rehberg@fishgame.state.ak.us

There are numerous telemetry-based studies under way of the various sea lions of the world. The purpose of this brief meeting is to bring together workers currently using—or otherwise interested in—field-deployed telemetry devices to study sea lion behavior. Although there will be no formal presentations, participants are encouraged to share their study questions, to describe the type of behavior-recording technologies and analytical techniques they are using to address questions, and to highlight the particular strengths and weakness of the techniques being used. A summary table containing this information, along with contact information for each participant, will be published in the conference proceedings and distributed by email.

Telemetry Attachment Techniques: What Works and What Doesn't?
Session leaders: Mary-Anne Lea & Mike Rehberg
Email: lea@zoology.ubc.ca and michael_rehberg@fishgame.state.ak.us

Many pinniped scientists around the world now have considerable expertise in deploying telemetry devices on otariids. This workshop is a chance for those involved in sea lion telemetry studies (past, present, or future) to share details on the successes and failures of various device attachment techniques and tag placements. Although there will be no formal presentations, workshop participants might like to bring data on the types of epoxy used, effects of tag placement, and the success of various antenna types. PowerPoint photographs of various attachment techniques and their outcomes would also help facilitate discussion. A summary table detailing the types of attachments and tag placements employed for the various species and their success will be compiled for the proceedings and emailed to workshop participants.




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